Second Stage Of Labor

pregnant woman

We learnt about the second stage of labor at our prenatal class yesterday. This was a continuation of the previous lessons, in which we studied the first stage of labor – latent and active.

PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS:

  • The second stage of labor starts when your cervix dilates from 5 to 10 cm.
  • Contractions are stronger and closer together. (Use breathing techniques to cope). They last around 60 seconds and are 2-3 minutes apart.
  • Pain is focused on the cervix.
  • Possible leg cramps.
  • Sensations of heat and cold.
  • Labor cannot be stopped now.
EMOTIONAL STATE:
  • Desire to sleep between contractions.
  • Nausea and vomit.
  • Possible discouragement.
  • Impatience and irritation.
  • Possible tiredness.
TRANSITION – is the end of active labor as your cervix becomes fully dilated and you ready yourself to begin pushing. This is one of the shortest stages of labor, lasting from 15 min to two hours, although on average it’s about 30 minutes. In this phase the contractions could get weaker and occur further apart. It’s a time for rest and regaining forces for what will happen next.
SECOND STAGE POSITIONS:

Pregnancy Day By Day suggests the following positions for this stage:

  • Sitting in an upright or semi-recumbent position. If you adopt a sitting position on a bed, sitting at a 45-degree angle can help your breathing and reduce the risk of a condition known as aortocaval compression, which can affect how your blood is circulated around your body and to your baby.
  • Because kneeling or squatting increases the pelvic outlet, many women will naturally adopt a squatting or all-fours position to give birth since they find that this is the most comfortable and easy position to deliver their baby. Upright squatting and kneeling positions help increase your pelvic outlet by around 28% compare to when you’re in a lying-down position. This means that there is more room for your baby to descend through your pelvis and into the birth canal.
  • Alternatively, you may find that lying on your side is your preferred position. There is some evidence that this position can protect your perineum from tearing.
  • Props: some women find using a beanbag, birthing ball, pillows, or a large cushion while kneeling and leaning forward helpful.
Next time we will talk about the expulsion of the baby🙂 Can’t wait!

HOW DID YOUR SECOND STAGE OF LABOR GO? IF IT WILL BE A NEW EXPERIENCE HOW ARE YOU PREPARING? PLEASE SHARE IN THE COMMENTS SECTION BELOW :)

You might also like:

First Stage of Labor – Active

First Stage of Labor – Latent

Childbirth Breathing Techqniues

Prenatal Classes – Lesson 1

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Categories: Childbirth

Author:Alinka Rutkowska

Alinka is a best-selling and award-winning Children's Author.

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